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100 Names for Sugar

I took the list below from a few different websites.  I’m not 100% certain that every one of the names is completely accurate (some, such as xylitol, I’m pretty sure are technically sugars, but different enough chemically that they aren’t really what we mean by “sugar”).

The main point is, processed foods contain a lot of sugar, and it’s often hard to spot in the list of ingredients.

The other point to make is that there aren’t really “good” sugars and “bad” sugars.  All of them are probably fine, in small quantities; all of them are harmful if you eat a lot of them, all the time. 

There’s been a lot of concern about “high-fructose corn syrup,” and that probably is worse for people than sucrose or glucose, but only a little worse.  The problem is, it’s in lots of processed foods, in large quantities.  Then again, since “high-fructose corn syrup” got a bad rap, food manufacturers have been hiding the sugar under other names (like “cane juice.”)  Look for sugar, especially, in foods that are advertised as “low-fat.”  Manufacturers often take out the fat, and load up on the sugar.  It’s a bad trade-off.

Of course, there’s sugar in a lot of foods which are minimally processed, like apples and oranges (with the skins on), and even carrots and onions.  Those foods also tend to contain a lot of fiber, which slows down the absorption of the sugars into the blood stream. The result is, less of a “sugar high,” less of an insulin peak, and less of a post-sugar plunge.  Also, the fiber fills you up, so it’s hard to “OD” on the sugar.

Bottom line: read labels, and choose ones that are stuck on raw, unprocessed fruits and vegetables.

 

Some of the (more than) 100 names for sugar:

Agave nectar

Anhydrous dextrose

Barbados sugar

Barley malt

Barley malt syrup

Beet sugar

Blackstrap Molasses

brown sugar

Brown sugar

Buttered syrup

cane crystals

Cane juice

Cane juice crystals

cane sugar

Cane sugar

Caramel

Carbitol

Carob syrup

Castor sugar

Coconut palm sugar

Coconut sugar

Confectioner’s sugar

corn sweetener

Corn syrup

corn syrup solids

crystal dextrose

Crystalline Fructose

Date sugar

Dehydrated cane juice

Demerara sugar

Dextran

Dextrin

Dextrose

Diastatic Malt

Diatase

Diglycerides

Disaccharides

Erythritol

Ethyl Maltol

Evaporated cane juice

Florida Crystals

Free-flowing brown sugars

Fructooligosaccharides

Fructose

fructose sweetener

Fruit juice

Fruit juice concentrate

fruit juice concentrates

Galactose

Glucitol

glucoamine

Glucose

Glucose solids

Golden sugar

Golden syrup

Granulated Sugar

Grape Juice Concentrate

Grape sugar

Hexitol

HFCS

High-Fructose Corn Syrup

honey

Icing sugar

Inversol

Invert sugar

Isomalt

Lactose

liquid fructose

malt syrup

Malt syrup

Malted Barley

Maltitol

Maltodextrin

Maltol

Maltose

Malts

Mannitol

Mannose

maple syrup

Maple syrup

molasses

Molasses

Muscovado

Muscovado Syrup

Nectars

Palm sugar

pancake syrup

Panocha

Pentose

Powdered sugar

Raisin syrup

Raw sugar

Refiner’s syrup

Ribose Rice syrup

Rice malt

Rice syrup

Rice syrup solids

Saccharose

Secanet

Sorbitol

Sorghum Syrup

Sucanat

Sucrose

sugar

Sweet Sorghum

syrup

Table Sugar

Treacle

Turbinado sugar

white sugar

Xylitol

Yellow sugar

Zylose

[this page was last updated by Robert Needlman, on 11-25-2018]